Jon Espino has three new reviews on The Young Folks

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“COLLIDE”

It is sometimes true that opposites attract, but that is only usually applicable to people and magnets. When it comes to film, you can’t just throw several opposing forces together and hope that it can be fixed in post-production. Collide is the embodiment of European house music. It has several great moving parts that individually would fare well, but together they crash and burn.

“THE GREAT WALL”

Whenever possible, you should go into a film with as little bias as possible. It’s unfair to go into a film with a firm idea of the film before you’ve seen it. We had that dog abuse allegation for A Dog’s Purpose earlier in the year, and we had the whitewashing controversy for The Great Wall. You have to give the film a chance and watch it with an open mind so you can draw your own conclusions. The difference between A Dog’s Purpose and The Great Wall is the dog abuse ended up being false.

“A UNITED KINGDOM”

No matter in what form films having to deal with social issues like racism, sexism and other forms of inequality appear, their societal importance will always be a redeeming factor. I’ve always felt that film is a powerful form of storytelling that can move people and transport them. That is one of the reasons I devote so much time to examining them. Films about historic societal struggles have started becoming more and more common, but no less important in today’s society. Films like A United Kingdom may offer a very familiar cinematic approach, but prove to be no less worthy of being told.

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